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Using Assumptive Language in Sales (and in everyday life)

a salesperson uses assumptive language to close a deal
Could changing the way you speak to clients and others change the outcome of your conversations?

Using Assumptive Language in Sales (and in everyday life)

Assumptive Language is a manner of speaking in which you assume the outcome or give the implication that it has already been decided upon. Essentially, you are implying a certain expectation or outcome, with enough confidence that the impression to the recipient is that the matter is a foregone conclusion.

By implication, you send subtle signals to the person you’re speaking to regarding your expectations. This in turn defines how they should respond and set their own expectations. This is a powerful skill that is easy to use once you get the hang of it.

Why is this so powerful? Read more below to find out.

In this article:

  • Assumptive Language in Sales
  • Assumptive Language in everyday life
  • Key Do’s & Don’ts for Powerful Language

Assumptive Language is a manner of speaking in which you assume the outcome or give the sense that it has already been decided upon. Essentially, you are implying a certain expectation or outcome, with enough confidence that the impression to the recipient is that the matter is a foregone conclusion.

The Power of Assumptive Language in Sales

When customers, clients or businesses are trying to determine if they should work with you or not, their confidence in you is a key deciding factor. The way you speak to them is a key way to show them how confident in your product or service.

When you use assumptive language in your sales technique, you subconsciously telegraph your confidence and desires to your prospect. This is the best way to let them know something they’ve been waiting for you to tell them: what to do next.

With well crafted language and tone, you can help close them towards the right choice for their needs. This takes the guesswork out of appointment times, package inclusions, and negotiations. Leaving less room for interpretation, flexibility, and movement ensures you have the upper hand while negotiating.

The Power of Assumptive Language in Everyday Life

In every interaction between people, communication is the means in which we try to get what we need. You can use direct language to gain power in every day negotiations too. If you can convincingly and confidently portray the facts of the situation as you see it, you paint the picture to the other party as to your expectations. Most people want to avoid conflicting points of view wherever possible; particularly in business situations with a customer.

Has the auto mechanic left room for interpretation in their packages? When you called customer service when they got your order wrong, what sort of implication did you convey to them? Of course – never “steamroller” people; but know that the service you receive can be vastly improved simply based on the way you interact with others!

Key Do’s & Don’ts for Powerful Language

Ok – so what are some tangible tips for using assumptive language?

DO:

  • Project total confidence in your vocal tone and writing.
  • Convey your expectations and desires through “immovable” terms. Paint a picture of the “details so far”.
  • Assume your prospect (and everyone else on Earth) wants what you’re selling, always.
  • Provide the information as you see it; give them an opportunity to respond with the only thing that seems reasonable, ideally a yes or a no.
  • Always be leading your prospect in the direction of what happens next.
  • Assume they are already at the next stage and you are working for them: Instead of saying “so would you like to work together on your search?”, say “I’ve started putting our search together. Were there any specific details we should include?”
  • Present bad news or unappealing bits simply as facts. This means providing the information without the taint of negative emotions, or being gun-shy because you’ve lost a deal before on these items.
  • Use the Royal “We”, so to speak. I.E. use group plurals to infer you are already a team working together: we, our, us, lets.
  • Use words like will, have, absolutely, never, correct, yes and now.

DON’T

  • Steamroller people. This will get you nowhere, fast.
  • Provide tons of unnecessary options. Bombarding your prospect with choices will make them freeze up.
  • Don’t Glaze over important details to progress forward. Always provide your prospect/customer/client with the full scope of information – even the nasty stuff. The key with delivering information you think will be received poorly, is to provide it with confidence. See the next point for further info:
  • Don’t assume in the wrong direction. Have a prickly negative selling point you fear will drive your prospect away? If you assume they will take the info poorly and project this, they will take it poorly.
  • Use weak word and phrases that leave things open for interpretation where is isn’t necessary. These include: I think…, maybe we should…, if you have a moment….
  • Avoid if, maybe, possibly, myriads of options, “should”, could.

The power of Language in Sales (and in everyday life)

Always be strong in your speech. When people drone on and provide non-answers, those who are listening tend to stop. Focus on being clear, concise, consistent, and strong in your writing.

Remember, no matter how hard you push – never seem pushy. Don’t be blunt. Never hide the facts of your product or service, since they will come to light eventually. If a prospect isn’t ready to buy with all of the information on the table, they’re the wrong prospect for your business. Next!

Happy Selling!

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